One question interview


We ask the author a single question, drawn randomly from our database. We present them all here for your reading pleasure. Think of it as an interview of the magazine itself.

Have a question you wish we’d ask? Submit it in the comments, and if we like it, we’ll throw it in the mix.



A question for Luke Elliott

Q: What do you think is the single most important quality for a good writer to possess?

A: Persistence. There will be days you want to quit. There will be months where you feel like all you are doing is banging your head against the keyboard and producing nothing remotely readable. You will get rejections. Oh, so many rejections. Saying “persistence” might be trite, but as long as you continue to learn and grow, it’s the path to success.


Luke Elliott’s story “Always Dawn to Forever Night” will be
published on Friday, 2 March 2018.

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A question for David A. Gray

Q: From where you do you draw inspiration for your characters?”

A: I take something from myself at a young age. when I used to stagger home from the library with armfuls of peculiar/comforting-smelling classic sci-fi, full of anticipation and alert for the local crazed bullies. But it’s from my kids that I take most, now: that heady mix of potential, hope, happiness and occasional heartbreak. If any of my characters convey even a little of that sense of opportunity amidst the darkness, then I’m flattered and happy.


David A. Gray’s story “Hishi” was
published on Friday, 23 February 2018.

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A question for Mark David Adam

Q: When do you decide a story is finished?

A: I often don’t know where a story is going, or how it will wrap up, until I get there. I believe that good stories are discoveries, or at least have an unpredictable organic quality, where the characters and events start to chart their own course. While some stories are thought out before I begin writing — or the end is known and it is the journey that needs to be discovered — I am often surprised by the ending and say to myself, “So that’s what happens.”

In terms of when I consider a story finished, as in, I’ve worked on it enough, not until it gets published. Almost every time I reread a story, I find something I hadn’t noticed before or that I could do better. Each time a story is rejected, I work on it before sending it out again. It is only that final stamp of approval that ends the process.


Mark David Adam’s story “Hold This Star for Me” was
published on Friday, 16 February 2018.

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A question for David Gallay

Q: What kind of pieces are the most fun to write (action, lyrical, etc.)?

A: The human mind has an underrated capacity for acceptance. The pieces I find the most fun to write are those that arise from characters placed in unexpected, uncomfortable or even horrific situations and then watching them navigate their way through it. No matter how dark or bizarre the circumstances, the act of living always finds its own lyric beauty.


David Gallay’s story “Cheminagium” was
published on Friday, 9 February 2018.

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A question for Yaroslav Barsukov

Q: Have you ever wondered whether ideas are thought waves directed at you by an AI supercomputer located in the distant future?

A: I have, actually. I don’t know where ideas come from or why it’s sometimes so easy to forget them; it’s as though someone would hand you a Post-it note and, in case you don’t display an immediate interest, pass it on.

Why does the supercomputer have to reside in the future though? I’m a big proponent of digital physics, Universe as an output of a computer program and all, and I strongly suspect that we and everything around us is a simulation. As soon as I say it, people immediately think Matrix; but what if there’s nothing else but the simulation? What if there’s no real us, or beings like us, outside the program’s boundaries?

The thought, to me, is too sad not to be true.


Yaroslav Barsukov’s story “Memory is a Rumor” was published on Friday, 26 January 2018.
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