One question interview


We ask the author a single question, drawn randomly from our database. We present them all here for your reading pleasure. Think of it as an interview of the magazine itself.

Have a question you wish we’d ask? Submit it in the comments, and if we like it, we’ll throw it in the mix.



A question for Andrew Leon Hudson

Q: What kind of pieces are the most fun to write (action, lyrical, etc.)?

A: I like to write “character” scenes, but that gets me across the borders and into action scenes, lyrical scenes, sitting-and-contemplating scenes, the lot. Any time you’re showing someone active in a story, you’re building up who and what they are, even if it’s only in the smallest way. So (just to tread on my own toes) I probably find action scenes the most fun to write because you’re revealing someone in extremis, and that’s when they can prove your expectations or be the most surprising.


Andrew Leon Hudson’s story “The Hole in the Wall” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 7 October 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Ekaterinya Vladinakova

Q: What is the first/most recent book that you lost sleep reading/thinking about?

A: Aubrey De Grey’s book Ending Aging – The Rejuvenation Breakthroughs That Could Reverse Human Aging in Our Lifetime. An amazingly detailed and highly credible book as far as how we would go about reversing the aging proccess; the horrible process that kills 100,000 people every day, and is responsible for untold amount of human suffering in the form of age related ill health & diseases and costing the global economy trillions in healthcare-related costs.


Ekaterinya Vladinakova‘s image “Siruveil” is the cover art for our October 2016 stories.Metaphorosis

A question for Allison Wall

Q: What is the scariest or most disturbing story you’ve ever read?

A: There are several in the running for most disturbing. “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson is the first story I remember being seriously disturbed by. Flannery O’Connor’s “Good Country People” and “Revelation” are up there, along with Joy Williams’s “Traveling to Pridesup.”  As far as scary, Jeff VanderMeer’s “The Third Bear” plain terrified me–I didn’t have the guts to read the rest of his collection afterwards.


Allison Wall’s story “Flann Brónach and the King’s Champion” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 30 September 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Hamilton Perez

Q: What’s your favorite kind of pie?

A: Strawberry. During the summer as a boy, we used to visit my grandparents in Missouri and my grandmother would make us wonderful strawberry pies. When I think of summer I still think of backyard fireworks, uncomfortable lawn chairs, and a plate full of strawberry pie in my lap.


Hamilton Perez’s story “Strix Antiqua” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 16 September 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Benjamin C. Kinney

Q: What do you think makes for a good story?

A: A good story needs compelling characters, an interesting plot, a captivating setting, and prose rich with action or detail. Those are the easy parts. Who wants to stop with a merely good story? I’d much rather read a great story. Greatness requires one more layer: a meaning that fills and overfills the bounds of the story, reaching beyond the characters and confines of the page. Every author dreams of writing stories that leave the reader with a new understanding – conscious or otherwise – of their self, society, or humanity.


Benjamin C. Kinney’s story “Shiplight” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 9 September 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.