One question interview


We ask the author a single question, drawn randomly from our database. We present them all here for your reading pleasure. Think of it as an interview of the magazine itself.

Have a question you wish we’d ask? Submit it in the comments, and if we like it, we’ll throw it in the mix.



A question for Molly Etta

Q: When do you decide a story is finished?

A: I’ll admit that I’m drawn to writing that is (or seems) fragmentary, so I might be in a bad position to identify when a story is finished.

But that’s not a real answer, so here’s another attempt: I know I’m approaching the finish of a story when certain recurring motifs begin to feel less like flourishes, and more like they are essential to the structural integrity of the whole story.


Molly Etta’s story “Solomon and the Dragon’s Tongue” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 20 May 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Brad Preslar

Q: What is the hardest part of writing for you?

A: The blank page. It stares back and says all kinds of terrible things about you, your talent (or lack thereof), and whether or not you’ll ever come up with anything worth defacing it with. It reminds you of all the other things you might need to do before you start actually writing. It scoffs at all the ideas you want to write on it. That said, once I’ve put down a word, then a sentence, and then a paragraph, the momentum seems to build. The blank page loses its voice. It’s just that first word that’s so hard.


Brad Preslar’s story “A Song Without a Voice” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 13 May 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Mark Rookyard

Q: Are you optimistic about the future of humanity?

A: I’d say I’m 50/50. There’s the excitement and wonder of new technology and where that can take us, but then I think there’s always humanity’s baser instincts holding us back from what we could truly achieve. I could never imagine humanity, with all its failings, will ever achieve a utopia.


Mark Rookyard’s story “Tides of Reflection” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 6 May 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Meryl Stenhouse

Q: What distracts you?

A: Oh, pretty much everything. I have to be very disciplined with myself to get anything done. At the moment I’m looking out the window of my study and noticing that the ginger needs cutting back and the front bed needs weeding. Or I’ll be in the dreaded middles of my current story is and I’ll get a New Shiny Idea and I’ll quickly jot down some notes and then find I’ve written several pages of draft. Or I’ll walk past the bookshelf and something will catch my eye and half an hour later I’ll have moved on to cleaning out the cupboards and will have completely forgotten what I’m supposed to be doing. What works best for me is an empty room and a locked door, and an endless supply of good tea.


Meryl Stenhouse’s story “Gathering Dust” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 29 April 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.