One question interview


We ask the author a single question, drawn randomly from our database. We present them all here for your reading pleasure. Think of it as an interview of the magazine itself.

Have a question you wish we’d ask? Submit it in the comments, and if we like it, we’ll throw it in the mix.



A question for Karolina Fedyk

Q: What’s your favorite story?

A: Just one favorite short story? I don’t want to dodge the question—but there are so many short stories that had changed me and made my world bigger, having to pick one is just cruel. However, when I’m thinking of a favorite story now, the first one that comes to my mind is “The Evening and the Morning and the Night” by Octavia E. Butler. Butler’s writing is precise and ruthless; she doesn’t spare her readers. And why would she, if she’s about to tell a story of sickness and depersonalization? But ruthlessness itself isn’t what makes this story so powerful—it’s Butler’s empathy and understanding for, and of, the world she created.


Karolina Fedyk’s story “The Early History of the Moon” will be published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 19 May 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Anna Zumbro

Q: What is your favorite fairy tale and why?

A: When I was younger, I read a collection of different tellings of “Beauty and the Beast.” I’ve always been fascinated by that story (and, especially, by the library in the Disney version).


Anna Zumbro’s story “Ways to Face the Firing Squad” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 12 May 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

Another question for L. Chan

Q: What’s an idea you’re dying to write but haven’t, and why?

A: I’ve always wanted to write about traditional customs in modern or futuristic contexts. Witches using iPads (done!), the merits of reincarnation versus immortality (or cloning vs uploading to computers, also done)… One day I’m going to have characters celebrate Chinese New Year in space.


L. Chan’s story “Heartwood” will be published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 5 May 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Carol Wellart

Q: What inspires you?

A: Most of the time I love to study nature stuff; animal facts and curiosities are always the main fascinating topic for me, but I’m looking for an inspiration in a literature too. Dreamy worlds and fantastic tales help me to develop my imagination, and I like to combine it with realistic outside themes.


Carol Wellart‘s image “Heartwood” is the cover art for our May 2017 stories.Metaphorosis

A question for Steve Rodgers

Q: What happens when you hit writer’s block head on?

A: My life is so busy, and my time to write is so limited, that writer’s block hasn’t really hit me. I think the reason is that I spend long time in the car to and from work, dwelling on my next story or book. These thoughts stew all week, so that when the weekend rolls around and I finally have a moment to sit down and write, they just explode out of me. If I had to guess, I’d say that writer’s block occurs when you’ve been at the keyboard too long, stressing about having writer’s block. I think the solution is to go do other things (especially exercise), all while keeping your next project curled up in the back of your mind. This is essentially what I’m forced to do by life, and it seems to keep me from getting the dreaded curse.


Steve Rodgers’s story “Canoes of Hava’iki” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 28 April 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Beth Goder

Q: If you could talk to novice-writer self, what bit of advice would you give?

A: Since I’m fairly new to writing, I’m not convinced that I’m out of the novice stage yet, but if I could go back in time and give myself one piece of advice, I would tell myself not to be afraid of failing. Much of learning to write, I’ve found, is doing things badly until I figure out how to do them better. In my office, I have a bulletin board filled with scraps of paper, a French postcard of citrus fruits, and my writing bingo card. There’s a quote from Richard Bausch up there: “You can’t ruin a piece of writing. You can only make it necessary to go back and try again.”

I’d also tell myself to go read some Anthony Trollope, because he is hilarious and excellent at that whole omniscient narrator thing. Read widely, young writer-self. Also, don’t be too worried about adverbs.


Beth Goder’s story “To the Eggplant Cannon” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 21 April 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.