A question for Benjamin Cort

Q: What work of art has been the most inspiring for you?

A: Eragon by Christopher Paolini springs to mind. I read it when I was little and fell in love, and am still so incredibly impressed by the fact that he wrote it as a teen fresh out of high school. Part of the inspiration is good old jealousy. I joke a lot to my friends about how far behind him I slip with each passing year of age. But more than that, I think the book goes to show that you can never be too young, too new, or too inexperienced to make something great if you’re willing to work hard at it.


Benjamin Cort’s story “Bluebird” was published on Friday, 27 October 2017.
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Another question for Phil Berry

Q: Can beautiful things be funny?

A: Rarely. Marilyn Monroe was both; Cameron Diaz, and Sandra Bullock have had their moments. Rowan Atkinson is not, by most standards, beautiful, but the laughter and joy he induces in me when I listen to old Not The Nine O’clock News tapes is… beautiful.


Phil Berry’s story “Lock Rise” was published on Friday, 20 October 2017.
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A question for Rob Francis

Q: What hero (of any gender) would you name your child after, if we lived in a society with names like that?

A: When I was younger I was determined to name my son Raistlin, after the conflicted character from the Dragonlance books by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman. Luckily, I haven’t, and both my kids have pretty normal names. In another reality, things might well have been different! ‘Elric’ also has a nice ring to it…


Rob Francis’s story “Beneath the Sea of Glass” was published on Friday, 13 October 2017.
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A question for David Hammond

Q: Do you ever feel bad for what you put your characters through?

A: No, I don’t feel bad. The main reason is that I don’t generally put my characters through anything that horrible. The worst experiences in my stories tend to be things that I have experienced myself: alienation, intense embarrassment, unrequited love. To pity my characters would be to pity myself, and I’m not about to do that. Instead I always try to leaven things with humor, which is my own best coping mechanism.


David Hammond’s story “Making the List” was published on Friday, 6 October 2017.
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A question for Kathryn Hammond

Q: What’s better: illustrating or having illustrated?

A: I think both are very important. I love the process of painting, creating, trying new things. Having illustrated is also very critical, because looking back at your old work and learning from it is one of the most valuable parts of art. I wish to continue drawing and painting all my life, expanding my repertoire and learning new techniques. A wonderful part of the illustration portion of creating is that I can translate my emotions onto paper, express my feelings and ideas. Once something is drawn, I look back at it from time to time to see how much I have grown, both as a person as an artist and remember the emotions I felt while drawing. Drawings get old really fast for me, as something I drew yesterday I can already draw better today. Moving on and just constantly practicing is what I enjoy most about art. So I guess my answer is both.


Kathryn Hammond‘s image “Fire” is the cover art for our October 2017 stories.Metaphorosis

A question for Angie Lathrop

Q: How do you generate story ideas, and how soon do you act on them?

A: I nerdishly carry a notebook at all times, and whenever I come across something really interesting in reading or in life (a phrase, a concept, a quote, almost anything) I write it down in my current notebook. I also use the notebook for to-do lists and brainstorming and practically everything I need to refer to or keep in mind, for my professional, personal, and writing lives. I don’t separate the notebooks into sections, so as I’m perusing the pages for a phone number, I’ll come across fragments of ideas that could turn into stories, so I’m constantly feeding those bits back into my mind to incubate. It might be months or even years after I record an idea in my notebook that I write a story about it.


Angie Lathrop’s story “Radical Abundance” was published on Friday, 29 September 2017.
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