About Steve Rodgers

Steve Rodgers works in security and cryptography, and has been reading since he was old enough to carry a stack of hard-bound science fiction books out of the library. He and his wife travel when possible (physically or mentally), though their mail is delivered to San Diego. He has published short fiction in various venues, and is a graduate of Viable Paradise XVIII. Writings and musings can be found at www.steverodgersauthor.com.


Steve Rodgers’s story “Canoes of Hava’iki” will be published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 28 April 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Ian Rennie

Q: Have you ever wondered whether ideas are thought waves directed at you by an AI supercomputer located in the distant future?

A: Honestly it would be a relief if they were.  It might mean that I couldn’t take credit for any of my good ideas, but it would also mean I couldn’t take all of the blame for my bad ones.  I’ve always liked the Terry Pratchett idea of idea particles whizzing through space looking for receptors in people’s brains, meaning we’re surrounded by creativity all the time.  In truth, though, a great idea is only half the battle.  The best idea in the world is nothing more than an idea unless you do something with it.


Ian Rennie’s story “Angels at the Border” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 14 April 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Juliet Kemp

Q: What happens when you hit writer’s block head on?

A: If I hit writer’s block, it’s usually a sign that there is some problem with scene, plot, characters, or all of the above. My immediate response, which I try to ignore, is to go and mess around on the internet. This is rarely helpful. To solve the problem rather than avoiding it, some level of thinking is required, worse luck. I sometimes sit down with marker pens (I have Copics, which are a tremendous indulgence but I do love them) and a colouring book and try to let my brain freewheel. Going climbing is good, too. Both colouring and climbing work well for occupying my monkey brain (the bit that just wants to hit refresh on Twitter) and letting the slower-thinking creative parts ruminate for a while. If I had a different sort of dog, walking the dog might work. Unfortunately if I stop paying attention to my dog, she considers this to be a reason to ignore me in turn, takes off after the nearest squirrel, and refuses to return. This experience does not generate anything useful at all brainwise, though all the running backwards and forwards is probably good cardio.

Lying down and staring at the ceiling can be surprisingly helpful, although sometimes it leads to napping. But then, napping isn’t always bad — once in a while I dream a solution to a story problem, which is exceptionally satisfying when it happens.

And, most importantly, all of the above work better when I add both chocolate and tea, in large quantities.


Juliet Kemp’s story “Scraps” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 7 April 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

About Ian Rennie

Ian Rennie is a librarian and writer in Cambridge, England.  As well as writing, he is one of the Cambridge organizers of National Novel Writing Month.  He was once retweeted by Neil Gaiman, not that he’s bragging or anything.

ianrennie.wordpress.com


Ian Rennie’s story “Angels at the Border” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 14 April 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Candra Hope

Q: What’s the piece you’ve made that no one else thinks is as good as you do?

A: My favourite piece is a dragon I painted a few years ago. Non-artists seem to like it, but none of my peers do. I think its maybe not as technically proficient as it could be, but I loved painting it and it reflects those darker parts of my nature that most people don’t get to see, so it’s quite personal in that way. And well, I love dragons, so I don’t really care what my peers think, lol.


Candra Hope‘s image “Scraps” is the cover art for our April 2017 stories.Metaphorosis