It came from Damien Krsteski

Damien Krsteski’s story “Lake Oreyd” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 24 March 2017. The relationship between faith and science interests me as a social phenomenon: I won’t deny I’ve enjoyed following the rhetorical tug-of-war, rooting from the sidelines for one camp, then, in equal measure and in eager anticipation, for their opponent, scrambling in the ensuing fray for every nutritional nugget of food-for-thought among the verbal chaff. But metaphysical debating aside, the subject attracts…

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Lake Oreyd – Damien Krsteski

The lake’s still surface was a golden quilt. The churches which amassed along the shore over the centuries now had their fossilized features balanced between day and night. A most sacred moment. The eyestalks, V-shaped like the chalice from which the Savior had drunk her poison, framed the setting sun, the tails like the scepters with which she’d been prodded to trial facing the rising moon. One intake of breath, the sun dipped down, pulling…

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A question for Damien Krsteski

Q: From where you do you draw inspiration for your characters?

A: It really depends on the character and the story, but I believe I can narrow it down to three sources. Some characters are based on, or are composites of, people I know. With others the characterization comes from mе, although in such cases I try to be very careful not to reduce them to mouthpieces for my own opinions or ideas: perhaps infuse the character with a trait of my own personality, make them react like I would in a similar situation, but then I’d veer right off, forcing our personalities to diverge. (Side-note: I especially enjoy writing in the first person about characters decidedly unlike myself.) The third situation is when another work of fiction affects me to the point where I think up characters in response, as if saying, “The kind of characters I like to read about would never do that.”

All that said, most of the time I feel like characterization just happens spontaneously, right then and there, when I’m writing the scene, or perhaps during the long walks beforehand. I may start off with an idea of what a character is broadly about, but the Aha! moments — when you truly understand why your character acted the way they did — come much later.


Damien Krsteski’s story “Lake Oreyd” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 24 March 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.