The latest story

The Last Duty – Dawn Lloyd

August 2019 cover
August 2019

The fireworks rocketed past the jagged remnants of the palace’s roof, soared above the razor wire, and then cascaded down behind the wall. The gunpowder boomed. The first four nights, my eyes had jerked to the remnants of the roof still clinging to charred rafters. I was sure the concussion would shake the last pieces lose, crushing me. But I had not been so lucky, and tonight I closed my eyes to shut out the lights.

Huddled in the corner, Petrov shifted. I opened my eyes to see him struggling to pull the wool blanket tight against the snow. Only two weeks before, the gold-rimmed dome of the palace’s great hall had cast a yellow tinge on the empire’s largest silk carpet. Now we sat on rubble and slush. The rebels who thought they could rule better than him had looted the gold.

“Are you awake, Jerov?” He asked.

“How could I not be?” I tried to keep the edge out of my voice. I had nothing but the highest regard for the man who had crushed the Charter Rebellion and held the islands together through the bread riots. I closed my eyes yet again, this time against the images of waves crashing over the torn and broken bodies our soldiers had hurled from the cliffs. The images grew still stronger with my eyes closed. There were reasons I was glad I had been Minister of the Finance and not a general.

“I was just thinking,” he went on, his voice quiet and shaky, “that the map to the caves where the desalination plant designs are kept surely burned with the rest of my office.”

Keep reading“The Last Duty – Dawn Lloyd”

Stories

Latest stories
The Last Duty – Dawn Lloyd
The fireworks rocketed past the jagged remnants of the palace’s roof, soared above the razor wire, and then cascaded down behind the wall. The gunpowder boomed. The first four nights, my eyes had jerked to the remnants of the roof still clinging to charred rafters. I was sure the concussion would shake the last pieces lose, crushing me. But I had not been so lucky, and tonight I closed my eyes to shut out the …
Read it "The Last Duty – Dawn Lloyd"
A Bear, or a Spider, or an Elephant – Edward Ashton
“The night sky is beautiful,” Seven says. “Deep and dark, blue-black and starless. It has a certain ineffable purity to it, don’t you think?” Mara glances up. This world is a young one, snugged tight against the galactic core. The stars above her are so fat and bright and crowded together that this can barely be called a proper night at all. She looks back to Seven, one eyebrow raised. “Not here,” he says, his …
Read it "A Bear, or a Spider, or an Elephant – Edward Ashton"
Never Fade Away – Claire Simpson
“Miz Ellerker?” The old woman looked up from where she was kneeling in her garden, tending to the tiny green shoots that were poking through the soil. “There’s a name I ain’t heard in a while,” she said to the young whippersnapper shifting from foot to foot on the far side of her gate. “I’ve gone by a few others in the years since then.” “But you are Miz Ellerker?” the kid persisted. “I was.” …
Read it "Never Fade Away – Claire Simpson"
The Offshore – Josh Taylor
Jesper Torus had been standing on the same spot on the sidewalk for almost thirty minutes. The building in front of him was older but well-maintained, with marble latticework and gold-tipped iron railings on the terraces. He held up the letter with both hands. His fingers had left dark smudges, and dried sweat curled the corners. This was the right address. Women in makeup and clean-shaven men walked in and out, chatting energetically, striding with …
Read it "The Offshore – Josh Taylor"

Issues

The latest monthly issues
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018

It came from Catherine George

Catherine George’s story “The Bear Wife” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 15 February 2019. The first line of this story popped into my head while I, like the bear wife herself, was up in the middle of the night nursing a two-month-old baby. Around that time, I’d been researching local baby and mum yoga classes and reading animal wife and selkie stories, so apparently my sleep-deprived brain mashed the two together. I wrote the …

A question for Evan James Sheldon

Q: Do you often include children in your stories? What role do they play?

A: I do often write about children, though I find I normally write from their perspective. I love to use some of the formal elements found in fairy tales in my stories, and even in darker stories, children offer decisive action and reaction that is, I hope, relatable for the reader. In this story, the daughter at the end provides a way for the mythmaking narrative to make sense and provides insight into the narrator’s understanding of his relationship with his father. My wife and I are expecting our first child, a daughter, any day, and thinking about the stories that we will tell her helped to shape the emotional arc in this story.


Evan James Sheldon’s story “There is a City, He Told Me
in Metaphorosis Friday, 30 August 2019.
Subscribe now for e-mail updates!

A question for Cindy Fan

Q: What is your favorite part of drawing?

A: My favorite part about drawing is the moment after I’ve figured out the composition of an image and can zone out a little bit as I begin to build up the colours and shades. I feel gratification from overcoming an important (and often stressful) step while being able to fully experience the relaxing physical sensation of moving a pen back and forth as I listen to either music or a podcast.


Cindy Fan‘s image “A Final Resting Place” is the cover art for our September 2019 stories.Metaphorosis

WSFA Small Press Award finalist – E.A. Brenner

We’re very pleased to announce that E.A. Brenner’s story “Familiar in Her Angles” was selected as a finalist for the Washington Science Fiction Association’s Small Press Award. “Familiar in Her Angles” was published in Metaphorosis on 21 September 2018. Congratulations to Ms. Brenner on this richly deserved recognition. See the official announcement and other finalists at WSFA or the Small Press Award site. The winner will be announced at this year’s CapClave in Rockville, Maryland …

The Last Duty – Dawn Lloyd

The fireworks rocketed past the jagged remnants of the palace’s roof, soared above the razor wire, and then cascaded down behind the wall. The gunpowder boomed. The first four nights, my eyes had jerked to the remnants of the roof still clinging to charred rafters. I was sure the concussion would shake the last pieces lose, crushing me. But I had not been so lucky, and tonight I closed my eyes to shut out the …

September 2019

Beautifully written speculative fiction from Metaphorosis magazine.

All the stories from the month, plus author biographies, interviews, and story origins.

Table of Contents

    • Some Sun and Delilah — B. Morris Allen
    • Favorites from Here and Abroad — Peter T. Donahue
    • A Final Resting Place — Matt Hornsby
    • The Guardian of Werifest Park — Carly Racklin

Cover art by Cindy Fan.

Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.