One question interview


We ask the author a single question, drawn randomly from our database. We present them all here for your reading pleasure. Think of it as an interview of the magazine itself.

Have a question you wish we’d ask? Submit it in the comments, and if we like it, we’ll throw it in the mix.



A question for Chanel Earl

Q: What would your animal totem be?

A: Every time I see a flamingo in the flesh, I get excessively happy. I could go on about their many wonderful traits, but I think what it really comes down to is their goofy legs and long squiggly necks. They can also fly, which sounds comical, but then ends up being majestic every time.


Chanel Earl’s story “Duet for Unaccompanied Cello” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 5 August 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Matt Thompson

Q: What was your favorite children’s book?

A: Clearly there are too many to choose just one. If pushed, though, I’ll go for ‘The Truck On The Track’ by Janet Burroway, wherein a fantastical circus troupe attempt to free their vehicle before it’s mown down by a train. Inevitably, they fail. The final orgy of destruction was always my favourite part as a child. The story has the quality of the best children’s (or adult) fiction, in that it’s entirely deranged; the cumulative rhyming form just adds to the weirdness. And there’s a yak involved. Tragically it seems to be out of print nowadays.


Matt Thompson’s story “Luminaria” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 29 July 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Jeanette Gonzalez

Q: How often do you think about writing during a day?

A: Depends on what I’m working on at the time. If I’m in the middle of a novel, I’m thinking about the story almost all day long, from the moment I wake up until the moment I go to sleep. Not constantly, but on and off through the day between writing sessions. The more often I can sustain the dream or trance, the faster I pick up where I left off when I sit down at the computer again. It’s far easier to finish a novel in a month this way, or three months for the longer works. If I’m between novels or short stories, I still think about writing, just not as often. I’m likely to become lost in a “what if” or a story fragment as waking dream while driving or cleaning. Long commutes are the best for coming up with new ideas or working out problems in a story.


Jeanette Gonzalez’s story “Serenity” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 15 July 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Jarod K. Anderson

Q: Do you often include animals in your stories? What role do they play?

A: I hadn’t really noticed before, but yes I often do include animals in my stories. I suppose animals have always been a big part of my life, so it makes sense that they have found their way into my fiction. As for the role they play in my writing, I think having characters interact with animals (positively or negatively) is fertile ground for character building. Harming or helping an animal in a narrative carries serious emotional weight. Beyond that, I’m interested in themes relating to human beings’ interaction with and/or separation from the natural world. I think I’m often aiming for the animals in my writing to be emblematic of a broader sense of nature.


Jarod K. Anderson’s story “My Dog is the Constellation Canis Major” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 8 July 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.