One question interview


We ask the author a single question, drawn randomly from our database. We present them all here for your reading pleasure. Think of it as an interview of the magazine itself.

Have a question you wish we’d ask? Submit it in the comments, and if we like it, we’ll throw it in the mix.



A question for David Whitaker

Q: Do you prefer your SFF as books or movies?

A: I love SFF movies, but I can never find enough of them and with a few noteworthy exceptions the production quality can often be disappointing (and the science ridiculous). By contrast, the realm of SFF books is far greater and much more satisfying!


David Whitaker’s story “Strangers in the Night” was
published on Friday, 15 June 2018.

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A question for L’Erin Ogle

Q: Are you optimistic about the future of humanity?

A: Yes, definitely. I remember watching a tragic event on the news years ago and seeing people run to help others despite the risk to their safety. Good will always triumph over evil.


L’Erin Ogle’s story “Nobody’s Daughter and the Tree of Life” was
published on Friday, 8 June 2018.

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A question for Samuel Chapman

Q: What is your favourite short story?

A: “Night Meeting” by Ray Bradbury from The Martian Chronicles. Nothing much happens in it–just a guy driving to a party and meeting a Martian on the way. During their conversation, however, Earthling and Martian realize they cannot tell the difference between future and past, and that therefore the only thing we can count on is the beauty of the present. Bradbury uses simple images to immensely moving effect. The whole book is great, but this is the one I can read over and over.

Honorable mentions: “Seasons of Glass and Iron” by Amal El-Mohtar, “Idle Days on the Yann” by Lord Dunsany, “Oh, Whistle, and I’ll Come to You, My Lad” by M.R. James.


Samuel Chapman’s story “The Foaling Season” was
published on Friday, 1 June 2018.

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A question for Gloria Wickman

Q: Do you often include children in your stories? What role do they play?

A: I haven’t included many children in my stories, but when I have it’s usually been to illustrate an episode early in a character’s life. I don’t think of writing children any differently than any other characters, so they could play any role depending on the context of the story.

What’s most important to me when writing is that every character, even minor ones, has a sense of agency in their actions so I’m always wary of stories that treat children more like talking props or symbols of innocence rather than fleshed out individuals.


Gloria Wickman’s story “Chasing the Light” was
published on Friday, 25 May 2018.

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Another question for David Hammond

Q: Do you use critique groups or other resources to polish your writing?

A: My critique group consists of my wife and my mother, who are both writers. They offer invaluable feedback, but I realize that it may not always be impartial or thorough. I have a Scribophile account, and I think it would be a very useful resource if I could manage to use it more often. I go back to Scribophile every once in a while to give it another try, and when I do I generally manage to do one critique, and then when I try to do another one I slip into a state of paralysis and self-doubt. Who am I to analyze this story? Am I being too harsh, too picky, too glib, too nice? I don’t manage to finish the second critique, because I run out of time, and I rationalize my behavior by reasoning that I am better off using my time reading the books on my Goodreads list and writing my own stories than critiquing the stories of others. This is true to some extent, but it’s also selfish and maybe self-defeating in the long run.


David Hammond’s story “Suzy’s Friend” was
published on Friday, 18 May 2018.

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Another question for Kathryn Yelinek

Q: What’s easier for you – imagining a happier world, or a darker one?

A: If we’re talking about a future for our own world, sadly it’s easier for me to think that this world will get darker, at least in the immediate future. However, if we’re talking about an imaginary story world, then it’s easier for me to imagine a happier one. I write and I read fantasy to experience places unlike the world I inhabit every day. Why not make those happier ones?


Kathryn Yelinek’s story “On the Scales of Dragons” was
published on Friday, 11 May 2018.

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