Yet another question for L’Erin Ogle

Q: Do you generally start with mood, title, character, concept, …?

A: Stories come to me as one character caught up in a bad situation. I see my main character/characters as possessing a good heart, caught in impossible situations. I build the story around the idea that while people may be good, the world is not, and that leads to making decisions in which there is never a perfect resolution. In the story, I hope to illustrate that we are all doing the best we can with what we are given to work with. I love my characters, but I know they always have a difficult journey ahead of them. I want to show that while at times the world is dark, there is always hope.


L’Erin Ogle’s story “Sorry, Sorry, Sorry, and I Love You” will be
published on Friday, 23 November 2018.

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A question for Tris Matthews

Q: What’s a genre you’d like to write, but don’t or can’t?

A: Poetry. I keep trying, and I’m not too bad at short, limericky things, but I’d love to write an epic (perhaps semi-epic) poem in a quite archaic style to tell a modern or futuristic story… Alas, my few attempts to date have ended quickly, as I slip into a very nursery rhyme like style.


Tris Matthews’s story “When the Last Friend is Gone” was
published on Friday, 16 November 2018.

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Yet another question for Filip Wiltgren

Q: Do you prefer your SFF as books or movies?

A: I almost always read my SFF, because I lack the time to watch a movie. Which isn’t quite true – I have the time, but it’s spread out during the day in 5-10 minute intervals. Which is just enough time to read a couple of pages, but not enough to get into a movie.


Filip Wiltgren’s story “A House on the Volga” was
published on Friday, 9 November 2018.

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A question for Evan Marcroft

Q: Have you ever wondered whether ideas are thought waves directed at you by an AI supercomputer located in the distant future?

A: I can’t say I have, until now at least. Supposing that’s true, I can’t help but wonder if we’re a form of story-telling to them. If our brain activity is directed by intellects beyond our observation, if what we say and how we respond to it is all decided by some other entity, if what we dream and what we do to pursue those dreams is decided by any amount of authorities at least one less than our eight billion, then are we not like characters in some vast story called Earth Circa 2018? I imagine those supercomputers tuning in to some time-piercing TV program to see how this million-year narrative is progressing, what plot twists are unwinding in this eleventy-billionth episode of Mankind. I picture a fair number of fans writing the producers complaining about plot holes and melodrama beloved characters dying unfairly. If that’s the case then I guess I hope that I’ve got someone funny writing the character of me, because if I’m going to be just one mindless side character out of billions with no agency or free will of my own, then I at least want to have some good lines.


Evan Marcroft’s story “The Little G-d of Łódź” was
published on Friday, 2 November 2018.

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A question for Jonathan Laidlow

Q: What’s a typical writing day like for you?

A: This is the dream of the typical writing day: I rise late and drink good strong coffee while looking back through the previous day’s draft. I then spend the day adding new words to my latest story and they’re all perfect.

The reality is somewhat different. I try to read the previous day’s draft either over a hurried coffee or on my commute to the office.

At lunch I find a quiet spot to sit with my laptop and write. Sometimes I’m working on a story, but a lot of the time I’m doodling with words. I keep the writers’ equivalent of a sketchbook and fill it with story fragments, ideas and scenes. You never know when you’ll find a nugget of gold in there that turns into a story or a novel.

Writing at lunch takes the pressure off, so by the evening I look at the current project. I usually revise the previous day’s words before I add new ones. Sometimes I have to go all the way to the beginning to seed new information and events, so I’m constantly revising as well as adding new material. I like to call this writing method “looping revisionary chaos”….


Jonathan Laidlow’s story “The Astronaut Tier” was
published on Friday, 26 October 2018.

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