A question for Kai Hudson

Q: Are titles easy or hard for you? Do you start with the title or the story?

A: Titles are pretty easy, mostly because I try to stay short and sweet. So long as it expresses the theme of my story, I’m good with it. I usually write the piece before I generate the title, but on at least one occasion I’ve written and planned an entire novel based on a title that came to me out of the blue one day. My muse works in mysterious ways.


Kai Hudson’s story “Combustion” will be
published on Friday, 28 September 2018.

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A question for E.A. Brenner

Q: What’s an idea you’re dying to write but haven’t, and why?

A: An idea I’ve been dying to write is a Mission Impossible-style magical thriller. I adore over-the-top spy movies and magic-in-modern-times fantasy. I haven’t even started such a story yet because I don’t have a character or plot to hang the genre on. I’m waiting for the day my main character drives through my mind in an incredibly sexy muscle car and orders me to get in.


E.A. Brenner’s story “Familiar in Her Angles” was
published on Friday, 21 September 2018.

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A question for Michael Milne

Q: What’s the story no one else thinks is as good as you do?

A: “She Waits, Seething, Blooming” by Dave Eggers is a perfect capsule of a story. It is the thinnest sliver a short story can be, a perfectly defined cross-section of a character’s life. It’s so, so good because it’s so, so short: the story itself is complete, and has a definite arc over its tiny wordcount. But it contains multitudes, and you can absolutely sense the world before the story takes place and the world after. We never learn the main character’s name, nor her son’s, but we get such a perfectly shaped glimpse of her life that we don’t need to. I remember reading this story years ago and suddenly being convinced of what short fiction can do, and I reread it (it doesn’t take long to read again) a few times a year when I need to edit!


Michael Milne’s story “The Yarnball Woman” was
published on Friday, 14 September 2018.

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A question for Douglas Anstruther

Q: If someone wanted to make an animated series out of your work, based on the title or recurring themes, what would it look like?

A: There are a few times in the story when the present isn’t holding Stig’s attention very well and we find him spacing out. Is he considering a leap to another branch? Maybe he’s moved on to another timeline and is letting the one we see coast on autopilot.

An animated series could show these other timelines in the background, constantly impinging on his attention, threatening to carry him away, competing with each other to be his next destination and coloring his decisions and mood with knowledge of alternate histories and futures that the people around him haven’t experienced. It’d look pretty trippy.

Also, dark. I like my animated series dark.


Douglas Anstruther’s story “Not All Those Who Wander Are Lost” was
published on Friday, 31 August 2018.

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