A question for Mads Alvey

Q: Do you write with a particular audience in mind?

A: I often write with myself as the intended audience. There are a lot of things that I enjoy seeing in stories, and when I write, I try to hit all of those notes. I try to include people like me—queer folks, gender minority folks, disabled folks; themes and subjects I care about; and evoke images that matter to me, or appeal to my sense of aesthetics.

I do write with the intent of sharing my work, but it matters to me that I, at the very least, start with a base that is true, first and foremost, to what I want in a story.


Mads Alvey’s story “Upon the Fallen Leaves of the Gingko Tree” was
published on Friday, 10 August 2018.

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A question for J. Tynan Burke

Q: What is your favorite part of writing?

A: At the craft level, I really enjoy writing dialogue. On a macro level, my favorite part is having created stories that my friends (and people like them) enjoy reading. If I hadn’t written them, they’re probably stories I would enjoy reading, too. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of hair-pulling involved in the final product, and I need some distance before I can try to appreciate the result.

If you consider reading to be a part of writing, then I like that a whole lot, too.

My least-favorite part, not that you asked, is fixing plot holes.


J. Tynan Burke’s story “The Bagel Shop Owner’s Nephew” was
published on Friday, 3 August 2018.

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A question for Felicity Drake

Q: Aliens. Are they out there?

A: In a vast universe, surely they are—although maybe in unfamiliar forms, or so far away that we can’t meet them (yet!).

It’s exciting to think that something so consequential is still totally unknown. It’s good to have a little sense of mystery in life.


Felicity Drake’s story “The Dream Diary of Monk Anchin” was
published on Friday, 20 July 2018.

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A question for Thom Connors

Q: Do you make art other than prose? What kind, and how is it different?

A: In what now feels like another lifetime, I was a musician. I was that kid in school who wrote lyrics in class, and read when the teacher was speaking, and for most of my late teens and early twenties, I played shows regularly. In retrospect, it was the lyric writing that I enjoyed the most. That realisation is what pushed me into prose, then flash fiction, then short stories, and novels. While I still compose music and sing along to Taylor Swift in the car, I don’t do shows anymore. But, I don’t really know how to describe the difference between playing in front of a few hundred, or thousand, people and having a story come out. Can they be compared? In terms of writing them, songs are bursts of creativity and emotion. Stores require more planning, and definitely more time.


Thom Connors’ story “The Forest of New People” was
published on Friday, 13 July 2018.

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A question for C. Heidmann

Q: If your writing style were a bird, what type of bird would it be and why?

A: Nah, a bird doesn’t work for me—unless maybe it could be a space-going bird! A bird is too limiting. It can only go as far as the atmosphere, around one tiny world, whereas I’d like to think my writing should be able to take me anywhere, out to the farthest reaches of the universe and beyond… into the multiverse, or whatever is outside our universe—and beyond even that.


C. Heidmann’s story “Time’s Arrow” was
published on Friday, 6 July 2018.

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