A question for Kaitlin McCloughan

Q: Do you generally start with mood, title, character, concept, …?

A: My best stories start with a character.

At any given time I have several ideas floating around in my mind for settings, concepts, or even opening lines, but it isn’t until I attach a character to one of those ideas that the story begins to form. The rest of the story takes shape based on the character—what they desire, what they have to overcome, and so on.

I certainly never start with a title. Titles are the worst!


Kaitlin McCloughan’s story “The Flight Home” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 1 April 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Jack Noble

Q: What book or books inspired you as a child?

A: Like many people, my childhood was practically made of books. Something that stands out as especially captivating is the Narnia series by C.S. Lewis. Images from those books are seared into my mind. Even today, certain sights regularly transport me back to that world: Turkish delight, lampposts in the snow, paintings of ships, and, of course, wardrobes.


Jack Noble’s story “Spoiler: She Leaves Him” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 25 March 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Gerald Warfield

Q: Why do you write speculative rather than realistic fiction?

A: I can’t help it. I was imprinted at an early age. As a little boy, I used to lie in bed and dream up stories that I’d continue from night to night. As an adult, I don’t limit myself to speculative fiction, but the increased possibilities, the broader palette for both character and plot are irresistible.


Gerald Warfield’s story “The Heresy Machine” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 18 March 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Octavia Cade

Q: How does writing speculative fiction affect your daily life (not as a writer, but as a person)?

A: For me, speculative fiction is a way of engaging with metaphor. Often that involves different ways of writing and thinking about science. I think if you want to attract more people to science – more than just the logically-minded, for instance – you’ve got to provide a different sort of pathway, a different means of engaging. I find science fiction in particular helps me to perceive science more broadly, from a place of imagination as well as method.


Octavia Cade’s story “The Sea Bank of Svalbard South” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 11 March 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Sabrina N. Balmick

Q: What is your favorite word?

A: Tintinnabulation is my favorite word. How musical it sounds. How magical. For me, this word always evokes a picture of fairy bells ringing in the breeze.


Sabrina N. Balmick’s story “La Belle Dame” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 4 March 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Jamie Killen

Q: Is there a specific environment you find most conducive to writing, and is it different for different kinds of scenes?

A: The only place I can get any writing done is in my home office. I’ve never been able to write in public places like coffee shops, and I can’t get any writing done if there is any kind of distraction (including music). In order to write I need quiet, stillness, and the comforting/sinister presence of the Dalek sculpture I keep on my desk.


Jamie Killen’s story “Seeders” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 26 February 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.