A question for N. R. Lambert

Q: What’s a genre you’d like to write, but don’t or can’t?

A: I love reading biographies, but (to date) it is one of the few genres that doesn’t appeal to me as a writer. As someone who often falls down deep wikiholes chasing answers to even the most innocuous questions, I think I’d become utterly lost in the sheer volume of research required to write a biography (and do it well). As with Scotch, Key lime pie, and graphic design, this is a case where I’d much rather sit back and enjoy the fruits of someone else’s labor.


N. R. Lambert’s story “Business as Usual” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 13 January 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for T. R. North

Q: How do you generate story ideas, and how soon do you act on them?

A: I take inspiration wherever I can find it—a great live performance, an inspired piece of installation art, something unusual that happened while running an errand.  I’ve gotten some of my favorite ideas for stories at the least expected and least likely of times.  As for how soon I act on them, I have to confess that I’m not always the world’s most patient writer.  I usually start fleshing out what I want to do with an idea and where I want the story to go as soon as the idea is fully formed, even if I know I won’t have time to write a proper first draft for weeks or months.


T. R. North’s story “Snow Queen” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 6 January 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for J. T. Gill

Q: Have you ever consciously written a ‘message’ story? Was it easier or harder than usual?

A: When I first started writing, I think all my stories were “message” stories…and they were terrible. I learned very quickly that when the message drives the story, the story usually suffers. As I’ve continued to write (and learn), I think I’ve gotten better at navigating that balance, but intentionally working in a message is definitely difficult. Very difficult.


J. T. Gill’s story “Never Miss: Moses Abebe is a Machine” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 30 December 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Taylor Hornig

Q: Are you an outline or discovery writer?

A: I’m mostly a discovery writer. I usually have a basic idea of the plot before I start writing, but it changes and grows as I work my way through the draft. I often realize that details I thought would be minor become crucial to the ending, or that I need to add a plot point I could never have imagined at the beginning of the process. I really like writing this way, but it does make my work days less efficient, so I’ve been trying to outline a bit more lately. Hopefully I can learn to have the best of both worlds!


Taylor Hornig’s story “The Doctor’s Mask” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 23 December 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Simon Kewin

Q: If you could have any super power, what would it be?

A: The ability to travel instantaneously to any point in the universe. Despite all its riches, the Earth is obviously only a tiny, tiny portion of reality. What other wonders are out there? I’d love to be able to find out…


Simon Kewin’s story “The Stars are Tiny Lights on a Perfect Black Dome” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 16 December 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Sandi Leibowitz

Q: What is your favourite part of writing?

A: My favorite part of writing is polishing.  I do love the initial fervor of the onset of idea–but I struggle (usually) with working out the whole story.  That’s where the hard labor comes in.  But once I have my “skeleton draft,” as I call it, I love to see how the story fleshes itself out, often in ways I never dreamed.  And I love to edit, but especially the part beyond mere copy editing, which is where the metaphors turn more apt, or interesting names are conjured up, etc.  Then the story ceases to be just a skeleton, even a fleshed out one, and gains a personality, maybe even a soul.


Sandi Leibowitz’s story “The Nature of Glass” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 9 December 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.