A question for Kathryn Yelinek

Q: Do you live near where you were born? Have you traveled much?

A: I live about 2.5 hours from where I was born. This is close enough to visit family on a somewhat regular basis and to make it into New York City when I want (a necessity since I adore Broadway musicals). As to if I’ve traveled much… How do you define “much”? I’ve traveled to South America and to Europe several times. The farthest south I’ve been is Venezuela. The farthest east I’ve been is Poland. The farthest west is California (although I was very young then and don’t remember much). The farthest north I’ve gone is Pond Inlet, on the northern tip of Baffin Island in Nunavut, Canada. That trip was devoted to seeing narwhals, the unicorns of the sea. It’s still one of my peak life experiences.


Kathryn Yelinek’s story “Hearts and Roses” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 25 November 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Allison Epstein

Q: Do you use critique groups or other resources to polish your writing?

A: I swear by critique groups—my writing output would probably decrease by half without them. When you’re writing by yourself, it’s easy to get discouraged and think no one’s ever going to read your work-in-progress. But when you know your critique group is going to read it, plus it has to be ready in three days, it’s serious motivation to get off Twitter and back to work. I belong to a stellar writing group in my neighborhood, where writers of various backgrounds and genres meet up weekly to talk craft, navigate plot holes, and drink too much wine. I’m also notorious for running story ideas past friends with no invitation whatsoever. My friends are used to getting phone calls that open with “Hi, so, question: octopus-people. Yea / nay?” I have very patient friends.


Allison Epstein’s story “Pandemonium” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 18 November 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Caleb Warner

Q: What’s better: writing or having written?

A: Both. It depends. That question is hard to answer because writing (at least for me) is very much story to story. What I mean by that is each story is its own world that informs the process involved in creating it. Sometimes the first draft of the story is the best part of the process, where you’re just banging out page after page in some kind of whirlwind, but after that, I usually find myself dreading the revision of said story. So ‘having written’ in that context is not as good as the actual writing. Then there are those stories where it feels like pulling teeth just to get a few words down. So writing is not at its best then either. At the end of the day, I think they’re both great and they are both awful.


Caleb Warner’s story “The Cartographer” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 4 November 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Karl Dandenell

Q: Are you a Luddite, or do you have the latest and greatest technology?

A: I consider myself a “Version 2.0” technologist. I prefer to let other folks find the bugs.


Karl Dandenell’s story “Comes the Tinker” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 28 October 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Jared Leonard

Q: What made you start writing?

A: My pursuit in writing was initially sparked by reading. I loved losing myself to new worlds and ideas and places, but as I grew older, I realized that the books I read didn’t always have what I wanted in them. I didn’t like when the villains were always so evil and the heroes too virtuous, or when endings were too bleak or happy. It was after realizing that I could make whatever story I wanted that I began to write more seriously. Now it’s just a matter of figuring out what I want in a story, which unfortunately, is the much harder part.


Jared Leonard’s story “Undertow” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 21 October 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.