A question for Alexandra Seidel

Q: Do you ever feel bad for what you put your characters through?

A: Not really. Under my pseudonym, Alexa Piper, I created a character once that seemed like a boring, two-dimensional villain, so I gave them a backstory and someone who loved them. That character became harder to dispatch, but dispatch them I did.


Alexandra Seidel’s story “A Picture of Home, in Silence
in Metaphorosis Friday, 24 July 2020.
Subscribe now for e-mail updates!

About Rachel Ayers

Rachel Ayers lives in Alaska, where she writes cabaret shows, daydreams, and looks at mountains a lot. She has a degree in Library and Information Science, which comes in handy at odd hours, and she shares speculative poetry and flash fiction (and cat pictures) at patreon.com/richlayers

@richlayers


Rachel Ayers’s story “The Chorley
in Metaphorosis Friday, 31 July 2020.
Subscribe now for e-mail updates!

It came from Felicity Drake

Felicity Drake’s story “Kozuna, the Ogre’s Child” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 3 January 2020. I’m a little embarrassed to admit how personal this story is. It’s woven together from my own experiences, people I’ve met, places I’ve been, and stories I’ve read. “Kozuna, the Ogre’s Child” is the name of a real Japanese folktale. (Grandmother’s version of the story is fairly similar to those you’ll find in collections of Japanese folklore.) The first …

A question for Jordan Chase-Young

Q: When do you decide a story is finished?

A: The splendid curse—the maddening blessing—of fiction is that a story is never finished. As David Deutsch taught us, any artwork is infinitely perfectible; you could spend millions of years improving a story one word, sentence, or scene at a time, but the combinatorially unbounded nature of thought means you’d still be infinitely far from perfection!

So if you can’t finish a story, really finish it, the question is when to abandon it. I have a poetic answer and a practical one. The poetic answer: I decide a story is finished when it makes me feel unadulterated pride to read it from beginning to end. The prose is clear and smooth, the action is balanced and organic, the characters have full voices and satisfying arcs, and the ending leaves one with a frisson of wonder and the feeling of time well spent. The practical answer: I decide a story is finished when I can no longer see how to improve it. Oh, I know there are improvements to be made, glorious ones just around the edge of thought, but I don’t yet have the knowledge to find them. So I finish the story and start working on another, in the hopes of getting better.


Jordan Chase-Young’s story “Shards
in Metaphorosis Friday, 17 July 2020.
Subscribe now for e-mail updates!

About Alexandra Seidel

Alexandra Seidel spent many a night stargazing when she was a child. These days, she writes stories and poems and drinks a lot of coffee (too much, some say). As Alexa Piper, she writes erotic romance that also leans toward the fantastical. You can follow her on Twitter @Alexa_Seidel or like her Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/AlexaSeidelWrites/), and find out what she’s up to at alexandraseidel.com.


Alexandra Seidel’s story “A Picture of Home, in Silence
in Metaphorosis Friday, 24 July 2020.
Subscribe now for e-mail updates!

It came from Phoenix Alexander

Phoenix Alexander’s story “Notes from the Laocoön Program” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 27 December 2019. “Notes” was inspired by a summer reading astronaut’s memoirs in Southern California. I was struck by the ‘Stepford Husband’ superhumanity of the literary personae they presented – and wondered what would happened if you started to poke at the cracks. Then I imagined a spacefaring program that might look for something… different. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so …