It came from Henry Szabranski

Henry Szabranski’s story “In the Belly of the Angel” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 29 January 2016. I’m a visual thinker. The inspiration for “In the Belly of the Angel” came from a single, sudden, unbidden image: of a large orangutan-like ape, squatting atop a pile of human bones, its wispy hair stirred by a strong breeze as it contemplated an opening in the floor of a vast, bird-filled chamber floating far above the…

Keep reading

Another question for Mark Rookyard

Q: What’s your writing schedule?

A: My writing schedule is a work in progress at the moment. I set myself the target of writing at least 1,000 words a day when I’m working on a story. To start with, that meant hurriedly writing a few words here and a few words there throughout the day before finishing off whatever words I had left to write when the family went to bed on a night. With this story, I set the alarm early (about 5 in the morning) and tried to get the words done before I went to work. That seemed to work pretty well, so I might stick with that. Finding the time is always a struggle though, and can’t see that changing any time soon!


Mark Rookyard’s story “Out Where the Rivenbuds Grow” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 12 August 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

About Santiago Belluco

Santiago is a neuroscientist born and raised in Brazil before moving to America to get the usual degrees needed to become a real scientist (namely a funded one). He now lives and works in Switzerland, where he writes speculative fiction and studies the neurocircuitry of vision.


Santiago Belluco’s story “The Bonesetter” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 19 August 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Chanel Earl

Q: What would your animal totem be?

A: Every time I see a flamingo in the flesh, I get excessively happy. I could go on about their many wonderful traits, but I think what it really comes down to is their goofy legs and long squiggly necks. They can also fly, which sounds comical, but then ends up being majestic every time.


Chanel Earl’s story “Duet for Unaccompanied Cello” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 5 August 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

It came from Rhoads Brazos

Rhoads Brazos’s story “… and now He erases” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 15 January 2016. With “and now He erases . . .” I was striving for the ultimate apocalypse, one in which the whole world quite literally crumbles away. It turned out to be a rather bittersweet tale, though still amusing in small parts. The aforementioned “He” is never named, and his demise isn’t explained. The main character, clearly Evel Knievel, isn’t…

Keep reading