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The Thousand Revolutions of Kronstadt – Pablo Valcárcel

Soon, the moment to die will come again. I do not look forward to it, but such is my duty to the revolution. For here, in the worker’s paradise, we all must fight for the future: from the nurse to the soldier to the peasant. But while they all trudge in the darkness of the present, the Futurographer scouts ahead to find the hard reefs of his death and map the future for all others.

And yet, what good is the cartography of my deaths in the Becomingness if it’s unable to spare my proletarian brothers and sisters? What good is being able to move swiftly through the dark chamber of uncertainty if we’re ultimately trapped in a jail—or even worse, the slaughterhouse?

Tonight, I’m being sent into the violent rapids of our future once more, but this time, I’m not to predict the outcome of a battle, but rather to help suppress insurrection at my home in Kronstadt. In a telegram, the Secretary of War, Citizen Leon Trotsky himself, demanded names—no fewer than a hundred—of those enemies of the revolution to be put under arrest and hanged.

The idea revolts me. I have many friends among the sailors, and I know what they stand for. Until now, Kronstadt’s sailors have been the Bolsheviks’ watchdogs and the revolution’s staunchest supporters. If they’re about to revolt, it’s not to sabotage revolution but rather to protect it. I know well that Ksana Vasilievna’s name would be on that list, and the thought makes me queasy with dread. She’s the one that started it all, but only because she was brave enough to come here to denounce the abuses in Petrograd.

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The Thousand Revolutions of Kronstadt – Pablo Valcárcel
Soon, the moment to die will come again. I do not look forward to it, but such is my duty to the revolution. For here, in the worker’s paradise, we all must fight for the future: from the nurse to the soldier to the peasant. But while they all trudge in the darkness of the present, the Futurographer scouts ahead to find the hard reefs of his death and map the future for all others. …
Read it "The Thousand Revolutions of Kronstadt – Pablo Valcárcel"
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Seeing the bodies of them girls hanging outside the town’s gates made me think coming here was a bad idea, but it was too late to go back now. The driver, Finnas, didn’t seem the type to turn these horses around no matter what I said, and Maw would send me right back even if he did. The kitties dangling alongside the girls made me feel worse. I didn’t know if the girls did anything …
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There isn’t much difference between night and day in this city, but we know it must be night when the train comes. It stops in the centre of the city inside its glass tube, the passengers standing shoulder to shoulder with their faces at the window: The Rat, The Flamingo, The Impala, several more, all of them watching us. After an hour or so the train moves on, out through the wall that encircles the …
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About Kathryn Yelinek

Kathryn Yelinek works as a librarian in Pennsylvania. In addition to the required hobbies of reading and writing, she enjoys bird watching, star-gazing, gardening, and going to see Broadway musicals. She shares her home with two parakeets, who she is actively striving to make into the most spoiled birds in the Western Hemisphere. They don’t seem to mind

www.kathrynyelinek.com


Kathryn Yelinek’s story “Hearts and Roses” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 25 November 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

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allisonepstein.contently.com


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As always, they heard the children first. Even in the strictest, most conservative towns, somehow, a few of the youngest or bravest managed to slip out to the road and wait for them. In other places, the whole of the population turned out, led by the mayor, or captain, or caliph, holding forth banners and flags and flowers to welcome the Tinker and his wagon, drawn by the steel horses that never tired. “The Tinker!” …