Another question for Amman Sabet

Q: Are you optimistic about the future of humanity?

A: I think it depends on the size of the groups we organize ourselves into. I find we are far more imaginative and fearful than we are capable of organizing ourselves. I am hopeful that in the future, technology will help humanity reorganize into peaceful, sustainable groups the size of small villages. We won’t need centralization as a strategy for safety and resources, so we may well trend away from cities. I’m not sure I’m optimistic that this future will emerge without pain, but I’m optimistic that it could happen given what we’ve achieved through our knowledge, innovation and mastery of the material world.


Amman Sabet’s story “The Ghosts of Daughters Possible
in Metaphorosis Friday, 8 April 2022.
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More about Amman Sabet

Amman Sabet is a writer and designer living in Los Angeles, CA. This is his second story published at Metaphorosis, and his stories have also appeared in The New Voices of Science Fiction, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, and Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2021. Amman is a Clarion alumnus, an SFWA member, and is learning a lot building an off-grid cabin deep into pandemic year three.


Amman Sabet’s story “The Ghosts of Daughters Possible
in Metaphorosis Friday, 8 April 2022.
Subscribe now for e-mail updates!

It came from Amman Sabet

Amman Sabet’s story “Absurd of a Feather” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 8 March 2019. This story was directly inspired by “Black Hole” By Charles Burns and “Uzumaki” by Junji Ito. However, I am sure there were many subconscious elements at play. when I wrote “Absurd of a Feather”, I was interested in the beauty and intimacy of what it feels like to find someone who is like you, contrasting that with the fear …

Absurd of a Feather – Amman Sabet

I’m getting a note from my doctor that will keep me out of the pool for gym. It’s not that I can’t swim. Last year I came in third place for breast stroke. This is different. I’m uncomfortable with taking my shirt off now, and I’d rather spend the period studying in the library while the other kids do laps and cannonball into the deep end. “Terrence,” my doctor tells me in his examining room. …