A question for Nora Mulligan

Q: Do you have any pets? Do they influence your writing?

A: I have two cats, Wally and Bon Bon (they were shelter cats, and we kept the names they had before they came to us). Bon Bon is a quiet mellow cat who likes only to find a sunny spot in which to nap, but Wally always wants to help with whatever I’m doing. When I’m writing, he will either be kind and just curl up next to me and purr (a great aid to concentration), or he will be his usual bad kitty self and plop all 14 pounds of himself across my forearms, not only preventing me from seeing what I’m writing but also preventing me from being able to write at all. So helpful!


Nora Mulligan’s story “The Circe Test” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 14 July 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

About Charlotte H. Lee

Charlotte is a science fiction/fantasy writer and lifetime avid reader. She turned her love of reading into writing while a teen, then raised her children to love stories and storytelling as much as she does. Now that her kids are grown, she’s moving on to sharing that love with the world. Charlotte lives in a small town outside of Vancouver, BC (Canada) – just far enough away for those kids to visit every week, but not close enough for them to raid her fridge every day.

www.charlottehlee.com


Charlotte H. Lee’s story “HOPper” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 21 July 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for T. B. McKenzie

Q: Where do you write?

A: Short answer; any table I can.

Expanded answer: I write in the margins of the day; the parent waiting table at my son’s martial art class; the staff table at lunch when I should be marking essays; the desk in the spare room at my parents’ house when the kids are playing with their presents; and the kitchen table when all else fails. I dream of a house with a wizard’s tower accessible by a creaky ladder with enough room at the top for a little desk and a kettle.


T.B. McKenzie’s story “BetaU” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 7 July 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

About Nora Mulligan

Nora Mulligan is a former lawyer and a present librarian, living in Peekskill, New York, on the shores of the Hudson River, with her husband and two opinionated cats.


Nora Mulligan’s story “The Circe Test” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 14 July 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Y. X. Acs

Q: Duckbilled platypus – result of divine distraction, or alternate universe crossover?

A: I’m going to have to go with neither on this one. I’m uncertain about the whole divinity thing, but my thinking is: if there were a creature resulting from divine distraction it wouldn’t be the platypus. I’d put my money on one of the nudibranchs or maybe one of the stranger weirdies of the Galapagos. If anything, the platypus is the result of divine inspiration; it has a bill that can detect electric fields, and the fine-detail work on its cuteness is just superb.

As to its near-interdimensional oddness, I will admit that an egg-laying mammal is more than a bit unusual. But I also think that the whole platypus controversy says a lot about social impressions, and how resistant we can be when a belief that we’ve inherited from science turns out to be wrong. In fact, while most people will tell you that the platypus is weird, I think many of them would be hard-pressed to tell you why the platypus is stranger than any other animal. The idea of a warm-blooded creature that hatches its young doesn’t really shock us anymore. Which means that the very foundation of its strangeness, its failure to fit into the then-dominant taxonomy of Biology, has in effect passed away; and yet we continue to remember that this animal probably won’t find a date to the prom.

In an ideal world, science would be able to graciously (and swiftly) change its core principles when faced with evidence that refutes a dominant theory. But then, I’m pretty attached to my beliefs too.


Y. X. Acs’s story “The Abjection Engine” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 30 June 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

About T. B. McKenzie

The gateway drug was Narnia, but pretty soon T.B McKenzie had moved on to stronger stuff. Lloyd Alexander, Ursula Le-Guin and Terry Pratchett solidified the addiction, and then along came the category one names like Jack Vance, Asimov and Iain M. Banks.

After that, there was no hope, and the only way to control the habit was for T.B to pick up a pen and start manufacturing.

His turf is Melbourne, his cover is teaching high school English, and he lives in constant fear that his family will discover his illicit after hour life that is fast spiralling out of control.

magickless.blogspot.com


T.B. McKenzie’s story “BetaU” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 7 July 2017. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.