A question for Matt Thompson

Q: What was your favorite children’s book?

A: Clearly there are too many to choose just one. If pushed, though, I’ll go for ‘The Truck On The Track’ by Janet Burroway, wherein a fantastical circus troupe attempt to free their vehicle before it’s mown down by a train. Inevitably, they fail. The final orgy of destruction was always my favourite part as a child. The story has the quality of the best children’s (or adult) fiction, in that it’s entirely deranged; the cumulative rhyming form just adds to the weirdness. And there’s a yak involved. Tragically it seems to be out of print nowadays.


Matt Thompson’s story “Luminaria” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 29 July 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

About Chanel Earl

Chanel Earl lives in Bloomington, Indiana where she parents three crazy kids, teaches writing and reading at Ivy Tech Community College, and thinks about dieting. She likes to read and write stories where strange things happen, probably because life sometimes seems so strange.

chanelstory.blogspot.com


Chanel Earl’s story “Duet for Unaccompanied Cello” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 5 August 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Premee Mohamed

Q: What’s your favorite non-SFF book?

A: The Name of the Rose, by Umberto Eco.


Premee Mohamed’s story “The Last” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 22 July 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

About Matt Thompson

Matt Thompson is a London-based writer of oddball fantastical fiction. He has also released upwards of twenty records over the course of a two decade-plus musical career. When not trying to emulate Jorge Luis Borges or Richard Pinhas he likes to pretend he can cook Japanese vegetarian cuisine.

He can be found online at matt-thompson.com.


Matt Thompson’s story “Luminaria” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 29 July 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.

A question for Jeanette Gonzalez

Q: How often do you think about writing during a day?

A: Depends on what I’m working on at the time. If I’m in the middle of a novel, I’m thinking about the story almost all day long, from the moment I wake up until the moment I go to sleep. Not constantly, but on and off through the day between writing sessions. The more often I can sustain the dream or trance, the faster I pick up where I left off when I sit down at the computer again. It’s far easier to finish a novel in a month this way, or three months for the longer works. If I’m between novels or short stories, I still think about writing, just not as often. I’m likely to become lost in a “what if” or a story fragment as waking dream while driving or cleaning. Long commutes are the best for coming up with new ideas or working out problems in a story.


Jeanette Gonzalez’s story “Serenity” was published in Metaphorosis on Friday, 15 July 2016. Subscribe to our e-mail updates so you’ll know when new stories go live.